Kiama & District Historical Society Presents Bruce Elder

Details

Kiama and District Historical Society is delighted to welcome Bruce Elder on Saturday 21 September 2.30pm in Kiama Family History Centre to talk about Aussie Towns. 

In 1988 when Bruce Elder started writing his vast guide to Australian Towns there was no internet. He drove to every town in Australia and collected books, brochures, travel guides and information which took up an entire wall of his study. Rewriting and updating the guide he has found, to his delight, that the internet now has everything … literally everything. It can tell a researcher the true origin of the word “Ulladulla” and allow an assiduous researcher to discover which “King” gave his name to Kings Canyon near Uluru in the Northern Territory.
 
In the talk he will give to the Historical Society, Bruce Elder will describe the vast challenge of writing about the history and attractions of 1,333 towns around Australia and explain how, over the past five years, he has written over 2.2 million words (he still has about 150 towns still to write) and how his Aussie Towns website is used by over 1.8 million people each year … many of whom make significant contributions to the understanding of the places of interest around the country. Check out the website.
 
Bruce Elder has been involved in the writing over 60 books and he has worked as a print and radio journalist in both London and Sydney. He is an award-winning journalist (Geraldine Pascall Prize for Critical Writing - 1996) who worked as both a freelance and full time employee of the Sydney Morning Herald for 25 years. In 1988 he wrote a study of the massacres and maltreatment of Australian Aborigines titled Blood on the Wattle which was praised at the time as ‘arguably the best book ever written about Aborigines by a white writer.’ It has remained in print since 1988 and is now in its Third Edition. It has been reprinted ten times. In a Sydney Morning Herald-The Age survey in 2000 it was nominated as one of the ten most influential works of non-fiction published in Australia in the twentieth century and will be available for sale at his talk (cash only).
 
As usual this is a free event followed by afternoon tea.